Reno Register of Historic Places

The City of Reno's Register of Historic Places is a list of properties within Reno city limits that have been officially designated by the City for their architectural and historic significance. Historic resources can be nominated to the register upon the owner's consent. Nominations are reviewed by the City's Historical Resources Commission in a public hearing and confirmed by the Reno City Council.

The local register was created in 1993 through the passage of the City’s Historic Preservation ordinance. It assists in preserving the exterior of structures and thereby preserving community character and sense of place, promoting community pride in history, inspiring heritage tourism, and improving property values. Resources listed in the City Register must secure a Certificate of Appropriateness for any exterior modifications, in order to ensure that any changes or improvements are in character with the architectural style or historic period represented by the building, portion of the building, site, and/or resource being preserved and do not diminish its historical significance.

This list, which currently consists of 17 structures, should not by any means be considered a list of the only properties of historical and architectural significance in the city--far from it. Hundreds of additional local historic resources are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Nevada State Register of Historic Places or remain unlisted but eligible for one or more of these registers. Anyone interested in listing their historic property on the Reno Register of Historic Places should contact the City of Reno for more information. Properties are listed in chronological order of their addition to the register.

NOTE: Additional properties once listed on the City's Historic Register include the Mizpah Hotel (lost to fire in 2006), the Mary Sherman House (demolished by the University of Nevada, Reno in 2019), and the Nystrom Guest House (removed from the register by Jacobs Entertainment when relocating the house in 2019).

Giraud/Hardy House

The Giraud/Hardy House was built by sheep rancher Joseph Giraud around 1914 (the date of the architectural drawings). Its architect was Frederic DeLongchamps (1882-1969), who designed it in a vernacular expression of the Colonial/Georgian Revival…

Phillips Stone House

After graduating from Western Dental College in Kansas City, Dr. Fred Phillips from Greenleaf, Kansas traveled west, arriving in Reno in 1906. He spent a brief period of time in San Francisco, offering his assistance in the wake of the devastating…

Southside School Annex

The Southside School Annex was built in 1936 through a grant provided by the Public Works Administration (PWA), one of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal programs initiated during the Great Depression. The Southside School had been built in…

California Building

Located in the northwestern portion of Idlewild Park, the California Building is the only remaining architectural element of the Transcontinental Highways Exposition of 1927. The elaborate Exposition celebrated the completion of the Lincoln and…

First Church of Christ, Scientist

In a town traditionally known for “sinful” institutions, it should not go unnoticed that between 1870 and 1950, downtown Reno had a total of 24 churches. The First Church of Christ, Scientist, which began with a congregation of just four members, was…

Washoe County Courthouse

This courthouse was the third for Washoe County, which was established in 1861 as one of Nevada territory’s original nine counties. In 1871, Myron C. Lake donated an acre of his land for Reno’s first courthouse, as the ambitious young town wrested…

McKinley Park School

Designed by the local architect George Ferris in 1909, the McKinley Park School was the first to be constructed of the so-called "Spanish Quartet," four single-story Mission Revival style schools built in Reno in the early 20th century. The…

El Cortez Hotel

Late in 1930, Nevada’s legislators pondered boosting the state’s lucrative divorce trade even further by shortening the residency requirement from three months to six short weeks. In anticipation of their success, local real estate investor Abe…

Pearl Upson House

The Pearl Upson House at 937 Jones Street was built on two lots in Block R of the Powning Addition subdivision in northwest Reno, likely in 1902. Laid out by Christopher Columbus (C.C.) Powning, the subdivision consisted of around 122 acres of land…

Patrick Ranch House

The Patrick Ranch House, a charming example of the Folk Victorian architectural style, was erected at the turn of the twentieth century on the Arlington Ranch, also known as Arlington Place. Jane Lake, the first wife of Myron Lake, acquired the…

Caughlin Ranch House

The Caughlin Ranch House, along with its outbuildings and pastoral setting, provides a rare and enduring link to Reno’s rich ranching heritage, right in the heart of the city. Since the early 1900s, this lovely Italianate home, one of the area's…

Christensen Residence

Andrew B. and Margaret M. Christensen purchased land in O'Brien's Southbrae Addition in 1938, and made plans to build a home there in 1941. Andrew, who worked as a service man for the Sierra Pacific Power Company, was listed as both the…

El Reno Apartment Home

The small house at 711 Mt. Rose Street is an original unit of the El Reno Apartments (see separate entry), which were constructed in 1937 at 1307 South Virginia Street. It was moved to this property, which was owned by Andrew B. and Margaret M.…

Holesworth Apartments

The two-story dwelling at 440 Ridge Street was constructed in 1922 as an apartment building with four separate 4-room apartments and a courtyard on its south side leading to a four-stall garage. The house is located in the Riverside Heights…

Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts

When the Pioneer Theater-Auditorium was completed in December 1967, it was going to be named the Apollo Theater. Instead, the golden-domed building came to be called the Pioneer Theater-Auditorium after the statue of a pioneer family that stands in…

Washoe County Library

After the demolition of the Carnegie Free Public Library, the Reno branch of the Washoe County Library was housed in the Nevada State Building, which by the mid-1960s, was slated for demolition to make room for the Pioneer Theater and Auditorium. The…

Ginsburg Clock

The Ginsburg clock, also known as the Park Lane clock, or Mall clock, was first installed in front of Ginsburg Jewelry Co., 133 N. Virginia St., in 1935. It remained there for decades before it was moved to the Park Lane Mall in 1967 and to its…