The Sprouse-Reitz Co. was described as “Reno’s most beautiful store” upon its opening on October 30, 1948. With more than 9,000 square feet of space, the variety store offered two floors of merchandise, selling everything from household goods and…

In the early 1920s, this part of South Virginia Street was starting to fill in with comfortable wood frame houses. The subdivision, known as Crampton's Addition, had been platted out in 1906, and ran from Virginia Street to Plumas Street.…

The small house at 711 Mt. Rose Street is an original unit of the El Reno Apartments (see separate entry), which were constructed in 1937 at 1307 South Virginia Street. It was moved to this property, which was owned by Andrew B. and Margaret M.…

The Ginsburg clock, also known as the Park Lane clock, or Mall clock, was first installed in front of Ginsburg Jewelry Co., 133 N. Virginia St., in 1935. It remained there for decades before it was moved to the Park Lane Mall in 1967 and to its…

Andrew B. and Margaret M. Christensen purchased land in O'Brien's Southbrae Addition in 1938, and made plans to build a home there in 1941. Andrew, who worked as a service man for the Sierra Pacific Power Company, was listed as both the…

The Giraud/Hardy House was built by sheep rancher Joseph Giraud around 1914 (the date of the architectural drawings). Its architect was Frederic DeLongchamps (1882-1969), who designed it in a vernacular expression of the Colonial/Georgian Revival…

At the corner of Hill Street and California Avenue sits a lovely Colonial Revival house that was home to five generations of the Howell family and later, as often happened with large close-in properties, adaptively reused as office space for…

The Herman House in what is now Rancho San Rafael Regional Park was the second structure in Nevada to be designed by renowned Los Angeles-based architect Paul Revere Williams. It was designed and constructed in 1936, just months after the ranch…

The Northside Fire Station at 624 East Fourth Street, was one of two new fire stations constructed in Reno in 1917, both in the "bungalow" style, which featured a front porch. While the Southside Station at the corner of South Virginia…

The story of the DiGiacoma Building began more than a century ago, when Paul DeGiacoma and Rose Gardella were married in Reno in 1920 and moved into a wood frame home at 212 West Commercial Row. In 1922, they purchased the Reno Italian French…

The Barengo Building at 151 N. Sierra Street was originally intended to look very different from its final form. Designed in 1930 by renowned Nevada architect Frederic J. DeLongchamps, brothers Natale and Camillo Barengo initially planned it as the…

Douglas and Essie Finley moved into the house at 380 Westbrook Lane in the 1960s. Unlike many of the early houses that were moved to Black Springs from other locations, the original Finley house was built here in 1963. The Finley's son, Donald,…

Ruffen and Gertha Lee Pettis bought a parcel of land in Black Springs, now known as 280 Medgar Avenue, from J.E. Sweatt in December of 1956. The couple had been living in Loyalton, California where their daughter, Bobbie Jean, went to high school. …

South Virginia Street was the site of many manufacturing operations in the mid-20th century, but the aromas from this one may have fueled the most snack attacks. It was the Circus Potato Chip Factory, constructed in 1936 as the De Somma Potato Chip…

The Benham-Belz House at 347 West Street sits on Lot 8 of Block E on the original Reno townsite. There is persuasive evidence that it was constructed in Reno’s founding year of 1868 or early 1869, making it the oldest known house constructed in Reno…

The Osbornes' house was moved to 290 Westbrook Lane in 1964 from a site around 6th or 7th Street in downtown Reno that was being cleared for the construction of Interstate 80. Phillip Osborne purchased the house at auction for $250 and had it…

The Savage Building at 628 South Virginia Street was constructed in 1940, but the history of the business that the Savage family operated there goes back much further, and continues today. Frank Charles Savage partnered with B.J. Genesy to open a…

The house where Barbet and Jewell Bufkin lived, at 375 Westbrook Lane, dates to approximately 1940 and was likely moved here from its original location sometime in the mid-to-late 1950s. Additional living space was subsequently added to the rear of…

In June of 1956, Jeffie and Carrie Townsell and their children were on their way to Seattle where Jeffie's brother, a merchant seaman, was going to help Jeffie find a job, when they stopped in Black Springs to visit Carrie's parents, Ollie…

J.E. Sweatt sold a parcel in Black Springs, now 295 Kennedy Drive, to Cecil G. and Nola Mae Carthen in December of 1956. The couple was from Oklahoma, where Cecil had been working as a mechanic for a lumber company. In Reno, he worked for many…

The house at 265 Kennedy Drive is one of the few from the early years that was constructed on site rather than moved here. It likely dates to the early 1950s. Thurman Carthen remembers it as the prettiest one in the neighborhood when he moved to…

The house at 320 Westbrook Lane was the second home that the Lobster family owned in Black Springs. William (Bill) Lobster was the Fire Chief for the Black Springs Volunteer Fire Department for many years. This house is one of the few in Black…